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Publications

Stylized Person working at Computer with Clock Theme GraphicI focus on producing high quality peer reviewed journal articles as part of an ongoing active research agenda. I currently have three publications and several under review and in progress. According to Sage Publications, my Journal of Contemporary Ethnography co-authored article, "Ethnographic Approaches to the Internet and Computer-Mediated Communication," was the most cited article from the journal in 2009 and 2010. My current focus is producing an edited volume entitled, On the Boarders of the Academy: Challenges and Strategies for First Generation Graduate Students and Faculty. The Call for Papers for the edited volume is included below. Each article is available to download in PDF format.

Publications

Standlee, Alecea. Forthcoming 2017. Digital Ethnography and Youth Culture: Methodological Techniques and Ethical Dilemmas. Researching Kids and Teens: Methodological Issues, Strategies, and Innovations. Vol. 22, Sociological Studies of Children and Youth. Edited by Ingrid Castro, Melissa Swauger and Brent Harger. Boston, MA. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.

Abstract
Conducting research with children and youth has become increasingly challenging in recent years. At times these difficulties come in the form of restrictions by Institutional Review Boards, funding agencies and parents. Additionally, changes in youth culture and behavior, specifically regarding online activities and digitally mediated communications, impact the access that researchers have to children and youth communities in significant ways. In this chapter, I propose that the use of an emerging methodological technique, digital ethnography, may provide researchers with new data sources on children and youth culture. Digital ethnography combines ethnographic techniques of observation, participation and interview with content analysis to collect rich data about online behavior, norms, expectations and interactions. This technique not only provides researchers with sources of data that allow insight into youth culture by acknowledging the increasing importance of online and digital interactions in youth culture, but may also address some of the concerns raised by IRBs and other interested parties about conducting research with children and teens. This chapter provides practical and ethical considerations of this method, as well as a discussion of limitations of data collection and access as it highlights new ways of studying youth culture, using emerging data collection techniques in innovative research projects.


Standlee, Alecea. 2016. Technology and Making Meaning in College Relationships: Understanding Hyper-Connectivity. Qualitative Sociological Review. 12:2 pp. 6-21.

Abstract
This article explores how the use of communication technology has transformed social interactions and the sense of self that is derived from such interactions by considering the role of presence and absence in relationships among college students. Analyzing interviews with 38 participants, the article explores how they construct understandings of presence, absence, connection and disconnection within peer social groups and intimate relationships, indicating the emergence of a culture of hyper-connection. The article suggests that technological developments have enabled forms of interaction that encourage frequent connection and the idealization of constant communication among participants. These findings further indicate that the normalization of hyper-connection may have impacts on relationship practices and constructions of identity among participants.


Standlee, Alecea. 2010. “Shifting Spheres: Gender, Labor and the Construction of National Identity.” Minerva Journal of Women and War. 4:1 pp. 43-62.

Abstract
U.S. Government propaganda during the Second World War promoted an opportunistic shift in gender and labor ideology. This article examines wartime posters to argue that a new definition of "home" was created during this era by media-based labor recruitment campaigns which redefined the private sphere to include the national "home front," maintaining an ideological separation from the public sphere of international and military action. This conceptual transformation allowed the participation of women in the labor market while supporting the ideological location of women within the homesphere, thus maintaining (and reinforcing) the hierarchical gendered separation of public and private domains.


Download Alecea Standlee's Ethnographic Approaches to the Internet and Computer-Mediated Communication Article

Garcia, Angela, Alecea Standlee, Jennifer Bechkoff, Yan Cui. 2009. “Ethnographic Approaches to the Internet and Computer-Mediated Communication.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. 8:1 pp. 52-84.

  • Journal of Contemporary Ethnography Most Cited Article 2009, 2010.
  • SAGE’s list of “Most Downloaded Articles 2009-2010.”
  • Sage Benchmarks in Social Research Methods Series. Vol. 3, Data Collection. Reprint. Edited by W. Paul Vogt. pp. 401-430. Thousand Oaks, CA. Sage Publications.

Abstract
This article reviews ethnographic research on the Internet and computer-mediated communication. The technologically mediated environment prevents researchers from directly observing research participants and often makes the interaction anonymous. In addition, in the online environment direct interaction with participants is replaced by computer-screen data that are largely textual, but may include combinations of textual, visual, aural, and kinetic components. This article show how the online environment requires adjustments in how ethnographers define the setting of their research, conduct participant observation and interviews, obtain access to settings and research subjects, and deal with the ethical dilemmas posed by the medium.

Under Review

Download Dr. Alecea Standlee's Living in a Techno-social World: Cultures of Connectivity in College Article

Living in a Techno-social World: Cultures of Connectivity in College

Abstract
In the latter half of the 20th century the widespread use of information and communication technologies has transformed the cultural landscape of the United States. These transformations have lead to fundamental questions about the nature of social interaction, the meaning of privacy and connection and the practices of social interaction. In this article I explore how the use of communication technologies has transformed social interaction and the meanings derived from such interactions. Specifically, I argue that the link between technologies and perceptions of being connected and present in a relationship has transformed the social experience of relationships among college students. Analyzing interviews with 38 participants, I explore how they construct understandings of presence, absence, connection and disconnection within peer social groups and intimate relationships. I suggest that technological developments have enabled forms of interaction that encourage frequent connection and idealize constant communication among these participants. Further, this research suggests that disconnection from technological connectivity is constructed as rejection of social interaction and intimacy. Such transformations in practice and meaning have contributed to the overall techno-social culture that is quickly taking center stage in the social networks of young people.


Download Dr. Alecea Standlee's Friends and Romance Online: Techno-Interaction and Relationships Among College Students Article

Friends & Romance Online: Techno-Interaction & Relationships Among College Students

Abstract
This article explores the emergence of technologically integrated cultural practices among college students in one US University. There has been significant research and popular cultural discourse surrounding the possible consequences of technologically integrated cultural practices among young adults. This project contributes to our understanding of technological impacts on college student culture. Analyzing interviews with 38 participants, I explore how they construct establish and maintain cultural practices and social norms that shape peer interaction and intimate relationships. I discuss the emergence of techno-social, or integrated, cultural norms that impact friendship and dating behavior. I located several distinct practices that contribute to an overall set of social practices that establish a culture of techno-integration in personal relationships: 1) the establishment and maintenance of friendships using social networks; 2) the use of social network profiles as means to collect data on potential friends and romantic partners as part of process of relationship building; 3) technological tools that are utilized to both manage and represent the goals and status of intimate and sexual relationships. These findings help to highlight a technologically integrated social world, in which relationships are navigated using a variety of communication methods.

Edited Volume Under Contract

Standlee, Alecea. Ed. Forthcoming 2017. On the Borders of the Academy: Challenges and Strategies for First Generation Graduate Students and Faculty. Syracuse University Graduate Press.

Abstract
This edited volume brings together work and discussion surrounding the unique challenges faced by first generation graduate students and college faculty within and across lines of race, class, gender and disciplinary specialty. Particular attention is given to strategies that may be successfully employed by first generation and working class graduate students and faculty to meet their unique challenges. Topics covered include: academic preparedness, professionalization, economics, social capital, family relationships, and mentorship strategies.

astandlee@concord.edu • Concord University • (304) 384-6054